WHAT IS GERMANY DOING TO REDUCE THE GENDER PAY GAP?

In Germany, the Wage Transparency Act entered into force on July 6th, 2017 and has since been implemented by employers and works councils.

Currently, the Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth is evaluating direct and indirect impacts of the Act for the first time. The Evaluation Report is to be presented by July 2019. Decisions on further necessary steps will be taken on the profound basis of these results.

Meanwhile the Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth in cooperation with the national anti-discrimination body will establish advice and support for employees. Furthermore, appropriate management procedures and wage-analysis instruments fostering transparency will be collected and made available. The free online-tool “Monitor Entgelttransparenz” offers a comprehensive and easy-to-use wage-analysis instrument for company reports and equal-pay-procedures.

The Federal Ministry continues to support the national Equal Pay Day campaign throughout the year. The campaign addresses the different aspects of the Gender Pay Gap such as vertical and horizontal gender-segregation of the labour-market as well as the high proportion of women working part-time, in non-standard or low-wage jobs. So every year a different focus topic is dealt with and high-level-participation of government officials is ensured.

Several Federal Ministries together with more than 100 stakeholders engaged in career counselling have established the initiative “Klischeefrei” (“free from [gender] clichés”) in order to cooperate and to free vocational choices of girls and boys from gender stereotypes or clichés.

IN WHAT WAY IS EPIC RELEVANT TO GERMANY?

Germany still has one of the highest Gender Pay Gaps in Europe. The reasons for this are diverse.

Germany see EPIC as a platform for exchanging good practice: What works and what does not? The answers to these questions can lead to substantial advice on how to develop and improve efficient policy measures and administration in the future.

Furthermore, there is a better chance for improving statistical standards so that figures and indicators can be better interpreted, understood, and compared.